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Exploration of impact measures of safety belt use laws. Volume 2, Literature reviewed, expert team comments on indicators, and indicator catalog
  • Published Date:
    1990-02-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-5.83 MB]


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Exploration of impact measures of safety belt use laws. Volume 2, Literature reviewed, expert team comments on indicators, and indicator catalog
Details:
  • Corporate Creators:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    DOT-HS-807-589 ; NTIS-PB90256090 ;
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • TRIS Online Accession Number:
    602864
  • Edition:
    Supplement to final report
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-Vehicle DesignNTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-Highway Safety ; NTL-LAWS AND REGULATIONS-State Laws and Regulations ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    Scanned by Ecompex on April 13 2007

    This project identified, evaluated, and recommended indicators of safety belt use law (SBUL) impact (other than fatality reduction and observed belt usage) as well as institutional sources that collect them. The project involved an extensive literature review, an expert team, and a National Safety Council sponsored survey of data sources. Four indicators out of 52 candidates were judged to have the highest potential for assessing SBUL impacts: (1) the "KABC" injury scale used on police accident reports, (2) the Abbreviated Injury Scale used on medical records, and its derivative Injury Severity Score, (3) occupant ejections from vehicles, and (4) head and face injuries including cranium, brain, and concussive injuries but excluding ear and eye injuries. Two data sources out of 160 surveyed satisfied most of the 13 evaluation criteria. The Major Trauma Outcome Study appears useful for a multi-state, before-and-after study of SBUL impact. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System could be adapted to gather national data to monitor future impacts of belt law revisions and other programmatic measures. The most promising long-term, state-level evaluation approach involves modifications of several data systems to link crash data in police accident reports with injury data in hospital medical records and trauma registries. Valid and reliable SBUL impact indicators are not immediately available from many existing sources and it is unlikely that they can be. generated quickly. It is recommended that coordination and integration of data-gathering efforts at the national level should be given first priority. This volume of the final report contains (1) an annotated bibliography of the literature reviewed for the project, (2) expert team comments on the potential indicators, and (3) a catalog of profiles of all potential indicators considered. /Abstract from report summary page/

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