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Integrated Corridor Traffic Management Evaluation Report
  • Published Date:
    2000-04-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-1.22 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Contributors:
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • TRIS Online Accession Number:
    793451
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION ; NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Design ; NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ; NTL-PLANNING AND POLICY-Access Management ; NTL-PLANNING AND POLICY-Management Systems ; NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-Highway Safety ; NTL-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS ; NTL-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS-Traffic Control Devices ; NTL-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS-Traffic Flow ;
  • Abstract:
    In 1993, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) forged a partnership with Hennepin County and the cities of Bloomington Richfield, and Edina to test the concept of integrated corridor traffic management (ICTM) across jurisdictional boundaries. The public sector partners launched the ICTM project in 1994 as a field operational test with partial funding provided by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and additional support by private sector partners. The selected corridor was an 8-mile section of the I-494 transportation corridor south of the Twin Cities encompassing I-494 four parallel arterial streets, and seven perpendicular arterial streets crossing five jurisdictions. The concept of ICTM was to optimize corridor capacity, traffic operations, and safety by the application of a myriad of advanced technologies including adaptive ramp metering, adaptive traffic signals, motorist information, and surveillance systems. ICTM used Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) to provide adaptive traffic control technology for both freeway metered ramps and arterial traffic signals. The deployed technologies were to better accommodate locally generated short trips during recurrent congestion while leveraging capacity of the parallel arterial system to augment freeway capacity during major freeway incidents. Institutional, organizational, management and operational as well as procedural infrastructure were also created to support the project. 7 Figures, 18 tables, 3 appendices; 87p.

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