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Prefabricated/Precast Bridge Elements and Systems (PBES) for Off-System Bridges
  • Published Date:
    2012-08-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-3.09 MB]


Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    FSU Project ID 029858
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • Edition:
    Final report; Mar. 2011-Aug. 2012.
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Bridges and Structures ; NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Materials ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    The

    Federal

    Highway

    Administration’s

    (FHWA)

    “Every

    Day

    Counts”

    initiative

    aims

    to

    shorten

    the

    overall

    project

    delivery

    time,

    enhance

    safety,

    and

    protect

    the

    environment

    both

    on

    and

    around

    construction

    projects.

    Using

    innovative

    planning,

    design,

    and

    construction

    methods,

    Accelerated

    Bridge

    Construction

    (ABC)

    techniques

    reduce

    on-­‐site

    construction

    time

    for

    new

    or

    replacement

    bridges.

    One

    aspect

    of

    ABC

    is

    Prefabricated

    Bridge

    Elements

    and

    Systems

    (PBES),

    where

    bridge

    components

    are

    fabricated

    off

    site

    to

    reduce

    on-­‐site

    construction

    activities.

    Many

    state

    departments

    of

    transportation

    (DOTs)

    are

    currently

    making

    efforts

    to

    implement

    PBES

    for

    construction

    of

    their

    off-­‐system

    bridges.

    The

    purpose

    of

    this

    research

    project

    was

    to

    investigate

    other

    states’

    standards

    and

    to

    evaluate

    them

    for

    possible

    implementation

    in

    Florida.

    An

    exhaustive

    search

    was

    made,

    and

    new

    literature

    was

    reviewed,

    to

    learn

    about

    current

    DOT

    standards

    and

    practices.

    The

    search

    revealed

    that

    the

    states

    with

    the

    most

    prefabricated

    bridge

    standards

    or

    activities

    are

    as

    follows:

    Utah,

    Alabama,

    Texas,

    Minnesota,

    and

    a

    collaboration

    of

    Northeastern

    states.

    These

    standards

    were

    reviewed

    for

    details

    such

    as

    the

    presence

    of

    post-­‐tensioning,

    joint

    types,

    design

    load,

    and

    inspectability.

    The

    two

    standard

    bridge

    types

    that

    show

    the

    most

    promise

    for

    adoption

    by

    Florida

    Department

    of

    Transportation

    (FDOT)

    are

    Minnesota‘s

    Inverted-­‐tee

    Beam,

    and

    PCI’s

    “Northeastern

    Extreme

    Tee”

    (NEXT)

    Beam.

    A

    summary

    of

    the

    findings,

    including

    advantages

    and

    disadvantages

    of

    the

    bridge

    systems,

    is

    included

    in

    this

    report.

    Also

    included

    is

    a

    comprehensive

    list

    of

    Web

    links

    to

    standard

    drawings

    from

    all

    state

    DOTs,

    as

    well

    as

    more

    information

    on

    ABC

    and

    PBES,

    which

    could

    also

    be

    helpful

    to

    expedite

    other

    research

    that

    involves

    standards

    and

    bridge

    construction/design

    practices.

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