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Sawing and sealing joints in bituminous pavements to control cracking
  • Published Date:
    1996-03-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-5.38 MB]


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Sawing and sealing joints in bituminous pavements to control cracking
Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    MN/PR-96/27
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • TRIS Online Accession Number:
    725569
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Construction and MaintenanceNTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Materials ; NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Pavement Management and Performance ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    The practice of sawing and sealing joints in pavements is not a new one. In fact, it is common practice in the construction of jointed Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) pavements. The idea of sawing and sealing joints in bituminous pavements is much less endorsed by those responsible for the construction and maintenance of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. Minnesota began experimenting with sawing joints in HMA pavements in the late 1960s. Since then more than 50 test sections have been constructed throughout the State. Test sections include HMA overlays of Jointed Concrete Pavement, HMA overlays of HMA pavements and newly constructed HMA pavements. The results show that in over 76% of the test sections, the formation of cracking was controlled by the sawing of joints. The unsuccessful sections were those where a deep saw cut was not made, those where the existing joints were badly deteriorated and those where the underlying joints were poorly relocated. All of these factors can be minimized through proper project selection and good design. This study involved a review of these test sections, identifying any problems associated with the saw and seal procedure, and gives recommendations for its use in Minnesota. Figures, table, photos, references, appendix. 1953k, 68p.

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