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Driver acceptance of collision warning applications based on heavy-truck V2V technology
  • Published Date:
    2016-10-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-2.56 MB]


Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    DOT-VNTSC-NHTSA-15-11 ; HS 812 336 ;
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • Edition:
    Research report; 2012-2014
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ; NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-Collision Avoidance Systems (Vehicles)NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-Collision Notification Systems (Vehicles) ; NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-Commercial Vehicle Operations ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    Battelle conducted a series of driver acceptance clinics (DACs) with heavy-truck drivers to gauge their acceptance of collision-warning applications using vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication technology. This report describes the results from Volpe’s independent analysis of DAC data, in particular data generated from intersection collision warnings (intersection movement assist, or IMA), forward collision warnings (FCW), blind spot/lane change warnings (BSW/LCW), and emergency electronic brake light (EEBL) warnings of hard braking by one or more vehicles ahead. A total of 112 subjects drove trucks towing 53-foot semitrailers through scripted maneuvers on closed courses and rated their impressions in surveys.

    The results indicated high acceptance in each of five criteria used to define driver acceptance; usability, perceived safety benefits, understandability, desirability, and security and privacy. The majority of subjects viewed the system as no more distracting to use than a car radio, but nonetheless thought it would result in drivers paying somewhat less attention to the road. There was no effect of age on acceptance. Warnings had both auditory and visual components and the combination of the two was preferred to either the visual or auditory components alone (although, for the visual component, some subjects felt uneasy with having to take their eyes off the road to see the screen).

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