Welcome to ROSA P | Promising transit applications of fuel cells and alternative fuels - 9094 | Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Technical Reference Center
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Promising transit applications of fuel cells and alternative fuels
  • Published Date:
    2002-06-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-197.51 KB]


Details:
  • Resource Type:
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT-Alternative FuelsNTL-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ; NTL-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT-Transit Energy and Environment ; NTL-PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION-Transit Energy and Environment ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    For over a decade, the Volpe Center has been providing technical support to the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Office of Research, Demonstration and Innovation towards the development, deployment, field test and safety evaluation of advanced transit vehicles and technologies. Of special interest is the cooperative DOT and DOE Fuel Cell Transit Bus research and demonstration program. This paper will briefly highlight policy, environmental, fuel economy, cost and other issues that are being addressed in developing the consensus standards and guidelines and policies for fuel cell buses, electric and hybrid-electric buses and associated technology and infrastructure. The development and adoption of safety standards based on performance specifications and of industry best practices are essential to early deployment. Public acceptance of alternative powertrains and fuels hinges on the successful demonstration of their safe, efficient, environmentally sound, and cost-effective in-service operation. Captive fleets such as buses typically utilize centralized fueling and maintenance facilities, and are well-suited to early demonstration programs. Insofar as transit buses typically operate in specific geographic areas under stop-and-go conditions, are very visible to the public, and may be able to share refueling facilities with other heavy and medium fleets, they represent an attractive transitional niche market for alternative fuels and for emerging “green” propulsion technologies. Flexible refueling and support infrastructure could help to provide cleaner fossil fuels, while at the same time supplying hydrogen to any potential fuel storage device. For example, an on-site reformer could be added to a CNG refueling facility thereby providing hydrogen for emerging vehicles that might rely on that fuel. Some environmental, infrastructure, technology and industrial base implications of different alternative fuel pathways are briefly reviewed.

  • Main Document Checksum:
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like:
Submit Feedback >