Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program: Cost-Effectiveness Tables Development and Methodology
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Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program: Cost-Effectiveness Tables Development and Methodology

  • 2015-05-01

Filetype[PDF-944.10 KB]


  • English

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      AGR-IMPACTS-Environment ; NTL-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT-Air Quality ; NTL-ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT-Environment Impacts ;
    • Abstract:
      This document presents summary and detailed findings from a research effort to develop estimates of the cost-effectiveness of a range of project types funded under the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program. In this study, cost-effectiveness was measured in terms of dollars per short ton of pollutant reduced. The estimates were generated to satisfy Title 23, Chapter 1, Section 149 of the United States Code, which mandates illustrative estimates of the cost-effectiveness of projects eligible for CMAQ funding. This research offers separate cost-effectiveness estimates by each criteria pollutant and applicable precursor under the CMAQ program, including: carbon monoxide (CO) monoxide, nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5). This research utilized EPA’s MOVES2010b (Motor Vehicle Emission Simulator 2010, Version B) model to identify emission impacts by criteria pollutant and applicable precursors. In this research, estimates of project-level impacts (e.g., VMT impacts, travel speeds) were combined with unit (e.g., per-mile, per-hour) emission rates from MOVES2010b to yield estimated emission impacts in lieu of using either direct estimates from projects or relatively outdated tools (e.g., MOBILE6.2, (Mobile Source Emission Factor Model)). The analysis confirmed the presence of distinct levels of cost-effectiveness across types of projects and pollutants. Project types with estimated high cost-effectiveness include: • Heavy-duty vehicle idle reduction strategies (with high cost-effectiveness for all pollutants in the study); • heavy vehicle engine replacements (with high cost-effectiveness for all pollutants except for carbon monoxide); • diesel retrofit technologies (with high cost-effectiveness for PM2.5, PM10 and CO); • transit service expansion (with high cost-effectiveness for NOx, VOCs and CO); • park and ride projects (with high cost-effectiveness for NOx, VOCs and CO); • extreme-temperature cold start technologies (with high cost-effectiveness for VOCs and CO); • intermodal freight projects (with high cost-effectiveness for NOx); and • dust mitigation (with high cost-effectiveness for PM10).
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