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EST! environmentally sustainable transport issue paper : soft measures and transport
  • Published Date:
    2002-12-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-823.45 KB]


Details:
  • Resource Type:
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-PLANNING AND POLICY-Public Participation and Outreach ; NTL-PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION-PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ; NTL-PLANNING AND POLICY-Travel Demand ; NTL-PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLES-PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLES ; NTL-PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION-Social Impacts
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    The purpose of this paper was to help guide and even provoke discussion at the workshop to be held in Berlin on 5-6 December, 2002, entitled Communicating Environmentally Sustainable Transport-The roles of soft measures in achieving EST. It's easier to understand the term soft measures by first considering its complement, hard measures. A hard measure is an action taken by government to change behavior that involves the use of taxes (or incentives) or the use of regulations or the provision of infrastructure or transport supply. Soft measures are other actions taken by government to change behavior. They usually involve the provision of factual information or the linking of behavior with positive or negative outcomes. In the usage of the present paper, a distinctive feature of soft measures is that they are noncoercive and relatively low in cost; i.e., they do not include taxes, regulations or major investments in infrastructure. This paper's focus is on the use of soft measures to change transport behavior towards Environmentally Sustainable Transport (EST). An environmentally sustainable transport system is defined as a transportation system that does not endanger public health or ecosystems and meets needs for access consistent with (a) use of renewable resources at below their rates of regeneration, and (b) use of non-renewable resources at below the rates of development of renewable substitutes. Endnotes, 2 appendices, 15 figures, 8 tables, 58p.

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