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Modeling of Microbial Induced Corrosion on Metallic Pipelines Resulting From Biomethane and the Integrity Impact of Biomethane on Non-Metallic Pipelines
  • Published Date:
    2012-09-01
  • Language:
    English
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Modeling of Microbial Induced Corrosion on Metallic Pipelines Resulting From Biomethane and the Integrity Impact of Biomethane on Non-Metallic Pipelines
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  • Publication/ Report Number:
    GTI PROJECT NUMBER 20916 ; DOT Prj# 293 ;
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  • Abstract:
    Biogas, generated through the anaerobic digestion of a variety of biomass sources, is one of the fastest growing renewable fuels. However, based upon its source (e.g., dairy waste, landfill, wastewater sludge, agriculture waster), biogas can contain constituents that may affect pipeline integrity and system operations that could possibly impede pipeline safety. One such known constituent are a class of microorganisms, prokaryotes associated with microbiologically-induced corrosion (MIC) in produced biogas and biomethane (cleaned biogas), that are carried over from the anaerobic digestion process. MIC is promoted by the presence or activities of microorganisms including bacteria and archaea. The specific mechanism of microbial corrosion is associated with the type of microbe or the synergistic microbial communities normally present in a natural environment. One general MIC mechanism considers corrosion of localized areas, under the influence of microbial activity, which is due to that area being more anodic than the surrounding area that has not been colonized by microbes. However, this mechanism is difficult to validate because of extreme experimental challenges in conducting electrochemical testing through two bridged cells, one of which contains bacteria and the other which remains sterile.

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