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Planning for active traffic management in Virginia : international best practices and implementation strategies.
  • Published Date:
    2012-10-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-681.46 KB]


Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • Edition:
    Final report.
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS-Freeway Management ; NTL-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS-Congestion ; NTL-OPERATIONS AND TRAFFIC CONTROLS-Traffic Flow ; NTL-PLANNING AND POLICY-PLANNING AND POLICY ;
  • Abstract:
    Active Traffic Management (ATM) applications, such as variable speed limits, queue warning systems, and dynamic

    ramp metering, have been shown to offer mobility and safety benefits. Yet because they differ from conventional capacity

    investments in terms of cost, service life, and operating requirements, how to incorporate them into the planning process is not

    clear. To facilitate such incorporation, this study developed guidelines for considering ATM deployments.

    The guidelines consist of four sets. The first set identifies required infrastructure and operational conditions, such as

    sensor placement and queuing behavior, to apply a particular ATM technique at a given site. The second set presents sketch

    planning analysis methods to estimate the operational and safety benefits of applying the particular technique at the site; these

    may be refined with the third set concerning a more detailed (and accurate) simulation analysis. The fourth set concerns

    continued monitoring of an ATM deployment at a given site. Also provided is a framework for incorporating ATM concepts

    into the regional planning process. The framework is illustrated with a hypothetical case study of variable speed limits

    implemented on I-66 in Virginia.

    Although Virginia metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) and the Virginia Department of Transportation already

    consider operational initiatives to some degree within the planning process, a key finding of this study is that there are several

    ways to strengthen the inclusion of operational initiatives. These include (1) using the guidelines developed in this study; (2)

    linking ATM initiatives to the MPO’s Congestion Management Process; (3) facilitating the computation of operational-related

    performance measures such as total vehicle- hours of delay; and (4) emphasizing, when applicable, the safety and environmental

    aspects of ATM. The rationale for such aspects is not to promote ATM as being more effective than other types of investments

    but rather to compare ATM objectively with these other types of investments. For example, Appendix A illustrates how to

    compute a benefit-cost ratio where costs include capital and operations expenditures for the ATM and where benefits include

    monetized values of vehicle-hours of delay plus crash costs. In this manner, the benefit-cost ratio for an ATM project may be

    compared to the benefit-cost ratio for other operational or capacity projects.

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