Impact of high oil prices on freight transportation : modal shift potential in five corridors, executive summary.
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Impact of high oil prices on freight transportation : modal shift potential in five corridors, executive summary.

  • 2008-10-01

Filetype[PDF-385.86 KB]


  • English

  • Details:

    • Resource Type:
    • Geographical Coverage:
    • OCLC Number:
      694185682
    • Edition:
      Executive summary.
    • NTL Classification:
      NTL-ECONOMICS AND FINANCE-ECONOMICS AND FINANCE ; NTL-ECONOMICS AND FINANCE-Economic Impacts ; NTL-ECONOMICS AND FINANCE-Freight Economics and Finance ;
    • Abstract:
      MAJOR FINDINGS • According to U.S. and international forecasts, oil prices could range between a low of $60 to a high of $160 per barrel through 2020 (in constant 2008 dollars), but the Central Scenario indicates that oil prices could stabilize at around $90 per barrel. • The more fuel-efficient rail and water modes are far less affected by fuel price increases than trucking, particularly over longer shipping distances and where Roll-On/Roll-Off vessels, which have significantly lower fixed intermodal drayage and port costs, can be used. • Because the demand for rail/truck intermodal services is increasing, available rail capacity is being depleted, giving the railroads the ability to increase prices and making existing and potential water services even more attractive. • Analysis of five major U.S. freight corridors that serve over 95 percent of the U.S. population – Great Lakes (and St. Lawrence Seaway), Gulf Coast, Mississippi River, East Coast, and West Coast – indicates that domestic waterborne containerized traffic has the potential to increase by a factor of 2 to 3 as diesel fuel prices increase from $2 up to $7 per gallon. • The Great Lakes, Mississippi River, and Gulf Coast freight corridors (which can divert traffic from truck and, to a lesser extent, from rail transportation) generate sufficient domestic traffic volume to initiate new water services. • Along both the East and West Coast, a portion of the huge and growing volume of U.S. international trade now distributed inland through gateway Atlantic and Pacific seaports can be moved by new coastal feeder services.
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