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Glance strategies for using an in-vehicle touch-screen monitor.
  • Published Date:
    2009-04-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-451.38 KB]


Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    UMTRI-2009-5
  • Resource Type:
  • Geographical Coverage:
  • OCLC Number:
    695036455
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-Human Factors ; NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-SAFETY AND SECURITY ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    In this study, subjects in a driving simulator followed a lead vehicle that continuously changed speed

    while they also performed a secondary task on a touch-screen monitor that could be located at various

    positions within the simulator. Subjects were instructed to give priority to the following task. Driving

    performance in the following task was affected by whether or not the secondary task was required, but

    was not affected by the location of the monitor. However, consistent with the instructions about priority

    of tasks, time to complete the secondary task was strongly influenced by monitor position. Farther

    locations required more time, especially for shorter subjects. Analysis of the number and timing of

    glances away from the road suggested that subjects coped with the more difficult monitor positions

    primarily by making more glances to the monitor, while the average duration of individual glances was

    not much affected. These results suggest that the subjects’ partial success in coping with the secondary

    task was possible because the secondary task could be broken down into partially independent subtasks.

    This study was part of a modeling effort designed to better understand the combined visual and motor

    demands of secondary tasks, and how they are affected by the design of controls and displays. Various

    ways in which this study should be extended to support that modeling effort are reviewed.

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