Welcome to ROSA P | Design of Large Stone Asphalt Mixes for Low-Volume Roads Using Six-Inch Diameter Marshall Specimens - 13190 | US Transportation Collection
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Design of Large Stone Asphalt Mixes for Low-Volume Roads Using Six-Inch Diameter Marshall Specimens
  • Published Date:
    1991
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-298.54 KB]


Details:
  • Creators:
  • Resource Type:
  • TRIS Online Accession Number:
    750979
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Materials ; NTL-HIGHWAY/ROAD TRANSPORTATION-Pavement Management and Performance
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    Premature rutting of road pavements constructed for hauling coal and logs is common. Although these roads carry low volumes of traffic, they are subjected to heavy and channelized wheel loads. Unfortunately, conventional asphalt mixes containing aggregates less than 1-in. maximum size in the base or binder course tend to develop premature rutting under these conditions. Many asphalt technologists believe that the use of large-size stone (maximum size of more than 1 in.) will minimize or eliminate this problem. Large-stone mixes are also economical for low-volume roads because of substantially reduced asphalt contents. However, most agencies use the Marshall design procedure (ASTM D1559), which uses a 4-in.-diameter compaction mold intended for mixes containing aggregate up to 1-in. maximum size only. This has inhibited the use of large-stone mixes. A standard method for preparing and testing 6-in.-diameter specimens has been presented. Mixes containing aggregate up to 2-in. maximum nominal size can be tested. A typical mix design using 6-in. specimens for a coal-haul road in Kentucky is given. Construction data and experience gained from field projects in Kentucky are also included. The proposed test method may be useful in determining the optimum asphalt content of large-stone asphalt mixes that are recommended for use on low-volume roads subjected to heavy and channelized wheel loads.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like:
Submit Feedback >