Welcome to ROSA P | Understanding how train dispatchers manage and control trains : results of a cognitive task analysis - 8738 | Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Technical Reference Center | BTS Data Directory | Federal Railroad Administration
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
Understanding how train dispatchers manage and control trains : results of a cognitive task analysis
  • Published Date:
    1999-03-01
  • Language:
    English
Filetype[PDF-5.60 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the thumbnail image to view the document.
Understanding how train dispatchers manage and control trains : results of a cognitive task analysis
Details:
  • Publication/ Report Number:
    DOT-VNTSC-FRA-99-X ; DOT/FRA/ORD-99/XX ;
  • Resource Type:
  • OCLC Number:
    49880289
  • Edition:
    Final Report April 1998- December 1998
  • NTL Classification:
    NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-SAFETY AND SECURITY ; NTL-SAFETY AND SECURITY-Human Factors ;
  • Format:
  • Abstract:
    This report documents the results of a preliminary Cognitive Task Analysis (CTA) that examined how experienced train dispatchers manage and

    schedule trains in today's environment The objective was to understand the cognitive demands placed on train dispatchers and the strategies

    that experienced dispatchers have developed in response to those demands, as an input to guide development and design ofdigital

    communication systems and advanced information displays. A hybrid methodology was used that combined field observations at two train

    dispatch centers (one that primarily handles passenger trains and one that primarily handles freight trains) with structured interviews of

    experienced train dispatchers.

    The results reveal that dispatching is a cognitively demanding task. Dispatchers have developed a variety of strategies that smooth the way for

    trains to pass through territories safely and efficiently and satisfy the multiple demands placed on track use. These include techniques to: off

    load memory requirements; extract information about train movement and track activity to support anticipation and planning; take advantage of

    windows of opportunity to satisfy the multiple demands placed on track use; and level workload. Many of these strategies depend heavily on

    communication and coordination among individuals distributed across time and space.

  • Funding:
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like:
Submit Feedback >